Saturday, June 27, 2015

Supreme Court Decision Will Not Alter Doctrine on Marriage




SALT LAKE CITY — 
The Church issued the following statement Friday June 26. 2015:
"The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints acknowledges that following today's ruling by the Supreme Court, same-sex marriages are now legal in the United States. The Court's decision does not alter the Lord's doctrine that marriage is a union between a man and a woman ordained by God. While showing respect for those who think differently, the Church will continue to teach and promote marriage between a man and a woman as a central part of our doctrine and practice."
The Church has outlined its doctrine and position on marriage in the document The Divine Institution of Marriage

June 2015 - Visiting Teaching Message - Link in Portuguese corrected



(Obrigado Herminia)

Sunday, June 21, 2015

Church Dedicates Trujillo Peru Temple - The second temple in Peru and 147th in the world




The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ second temple in Peru was dedicated on Sunday, June 21, 2015. President Dieter F. Uchtdorf, second counselor in the Church’s First Presidency, presided over the services and gave the dedicatory prayer.

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Utah Valley University Creates “Texting Lane” on Busy Staircase


text by Michael Rosen, Fusion

The Church has talked repeatedly about the use of social media and cell phones. What do you think of how we use electronics today, especially in schools and among younger generations?

There’s a “culture of walking and texting” on the Utah Valley University campus, according to conversations with students, but that’s not the main reason Matt Bambrough, the creative director at UVU, came up with an idea to paint a “texting lane” on a staircase leading up to the brand-new Student and Wellness Center. According to Bambrough, it’s first and foremost a design project—the texting lane was a tongue-in-cheek reference to the college-wide epidemic of kids walking around with their faces buried in their iPhones.
“You have 18-24 year olds walking down the hall with smartphones, you’re almost bound to run into someone somewhere; it’s something we’re dealing with in this day and age,” Bambrough told Fusion. “But (preventing collisions) isn’t the reason we did it—we did it to engage the students. It’s meant to be there for people to look at and enjoy.”
Still, when talking to a few Utah Valley students, it sounds like texting and walking can be quite the annoyance.
According to Kenzie Jones, a sports editor at the UVU Review (Utah Valley’s student newspaper), the entire Orem, Utah campus can be traversed while remaining indoors. This is useful in the winter, when the weather’s routinely below freezing—unfortunately, texters and walkers clog up the indoor hallways, rendering it difficult for students to get to class on time. “People just walk slowly with phones in front of their faces,” Jones told Fusion.
Jones said she once saw a student holding a trombone almost crash into a walker/texter, sending the trombone carrier stumbling backwards.
Robbie Poffenberger, an assistant news editor at the UVU Review, said that most collisions he witnesses aren’t human-on-human; rather, it’s generally human-on-inanimate-object.
“They walk into barriers—chairs on the side of the hallway, or railings,” Poffenberger said. “I’m sure they’re fairly embarrassed.”
Poffenberger admits he’s not innocent—”I’m not perfect,” he says—and neither is Brambrough, who says he hopes reduced texting-and-walking is a side effect of the art project, though he’s not hopeful.